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Field Guide to the Pitcher Plants of the Philippines




As an avid traveler and nature explorer, I always include in my  journal notes some of the unusual flora and fauna I encountered along the way. I have the belief that your travel is of no value if you wouldn’t include appreciating the beauty of your environment. You need to have at least a little knowledge on the flora and fauna as it may present some interesting story to tell in your journey. Sometimes it is just not enough to wonder on the unique beauty of the places you visit without a little investigation on little things you encounter along the way.

In my recent escapade in Mindanao, I was awed with the rich biodiversity of the remaining forests at the east side of the island. Once, I accidentally bumped with a carnivorous plant known as Nepenthes merrilliana along the road of Noventa in Surigao del Norte. The said species is just being removed from its habitat along with other dwarf tree species to give way to the ongoing road construction. Another encounter was the multiple sightings of different species thriving in a single place in a forest in Agusan del Sur.

Fascinated with their existence, my colleague and I decided to look for a book that shall aid us to pre-identify this interesting plant. With the help of a friend, Dr, Melanie Medecilo of DLSU-D, she mentioned that Dr. Victor Amoroso has recently released a book on the field identification for the said genus. And so I emailed him and he responded quickly on my inquiry.



Dr. Amoroso’s book “Field Guide to the Pitcher Plants of the Philippines” is co authored by a British naturalist and  IUCN Plant Conservation Awardee  Stewart McPherson. The 61 paged book features the 27 pitcher plants that are found in the Philippines. Each species was described extensively with corresponding illustrations for easy identification. In the description, the authors described in details the morphological characteristics differentiating one species from the others. It revealed also the geographical distribution of Nepenthes in the Philippines from the most common Philippine endemic N. alata to giant N. truncata. This field guide would be very helpful for nature and plant enthusiasts/hobbyist, students and even professionals.

The book is PHP 850.00 per copy including the local freight. For details you can email Dr. Victor Amoroso at amorosovic@yahoo.com.

Note:
Identifying anything unusual plants or animals doesn’t mean you have to collect or harvest them from its natural habitat. Some of these are endangered species and utmost care and preservation is needed. Coordinate with your local government unit and the DENR if you see one in your locality.


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24 comments :

  1. I'm really intrigued by the pitcher plant as its a rare type of plant and it has unique features.

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  2. Pitcher Plant first time to hear that kind of a plant. Thanks for sharing this wiith us.

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  3. I had a batch mate in UP whose thesis involves propagating Nepenthes (genus of a pitcher plant) in an artificial environment. Ang mahal pala talaga ng Pitcher plants. :D

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  4. My memory about pitcher plant was from horror movies from long ago where carnivorous plants grew very large and ate humans. Wow, 27 kinds of pitcher plants in the Philippines ... we are blessed by nature and hope we are not foolish enough to destroy all these =)

    Thanks for sharing this.

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  5. What a great nature creation. Pitcher plants are indeed one of a kind. Glad that Philippines do have the best of them.

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  6. thanks for sharing. didn't know we had those variety in the Philippines

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  7. thanks for sharing valuable info..who would have thought that we have different types of pitcher plants here in the philippines. :)

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  8. That's a scary carnivorous plant. I haven't personally seen one.

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  9. You and Sir Rence Chan will definitely have a fruitful conversation about plants! :)

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  10. this is really the first time i saw this Pitcher Plant and heard about it..

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  11. I did'nt know that we have those type of plants in the Philippines! It would be a nice experience to see an actual one!

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  12. I haven't personally seen one and they are indeed unique.

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  13. This is quite fascinating although your "Note" should be considered by the more adventurous ones.

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  14. I may have seen pitcher plants before (or perhaps of the same genus) here in Thailand. They have a lot of botanical gardens here.

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  15. I'm inspired by you -- for going the extra mile! :) This is another great way of documenting your trips, as it's always refreshing to see something this extraordinary in the Philippines -- let alone in Mindanao. :)

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  16. That is a pretty looking flower. i never seen t before and they have 27 different kind, wow.I am curious now how they differ from each other.

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  17. There are also many extraordinary plants in the Philippines that needs to be discover! I wish I could collect them all.

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  18. i think i've heard about pitcher plants before.. they are so unique and beautiful :)

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  19. Victreebell.. (Did I spell it correctly? Haha) [It's a pokemon)

    Well, this is quite a strange-looking but a beautiful flower. :)

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  20. Amazing beautiful flower pitcher plant.. I have watched about nature in GMA newsTV and learned about pitcher plants :)

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  21. pitchers are not flower but part of the leaves of the plant itself ... modified one :D

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  22. i hope these natural resources be preserved... ah, the price of development. Yahweh bless.

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  23. This plant looks unique. I know my colleague will like this once he sees this. ^_^

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  24. That looks so pretty. These plants are carnivore, right? Kinda like Venus flytrap, I think.

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